Tuesday Courses

Another Great Semester is About to Begin

This fall, we invite you to take part in a semester full of enriching in-person, virtual, and hybrid courses. You can view classes by day, self-drive tours, and, back by popular demand, special events! Online registration closed on September 26th at 5 p.m., but late registrations will be accepted by phone at 513-529-8500.

All courses are scheduled in local (Ohio) time, which currently follows Eastern Daylight Time (EDT). Note that EDT ends on November 6, 2022.

Fall Neotropical Migrants: A Closer Look (Literally!)

Fall neotropical bird migrants are often a challenge to identify—hence the confusing “fall warblers” label. We will use the AREI bird banding stations to get a closer look at these challenging species. The class will emphasize both bird identification and neotropical bird conservation.

Instructor: Dave Russell is an Associate Teaching Professor in the biology department at Miami and is the Research Director for Avian Research and Education Institute, Inc. (AREI), a nonprofit organization that uses its bird banding station in Oxford, Ohio for research and as an outdoor classroom.

7 Tuesdays: September 13–October 25; 7:30–9:30 a.m.
Format: In-person
Location: Hueston Woods State Park, AREI Bird Banding Station
NOTE: Early start date; rain on Tuesday postpones class until Thursday.


Yoga for Body and Mind*

This yoga class is designed to move your whole body through a complete series of seated and standing yoga poses. Designed to increase flexibility, balance, and range of motion, chair support is offered to safely perform a variety of seated and standing postures. Restorative exercise and final relaxation will promote stress reduction and mental clarity.

Instructor: Ashley Crossley is a certified yoga instructor who has been with Berkeley Square Elements for eight years.

5 Tuesdays and Thursdays: October 4–November 3; 9–9:45 a.m.
Format: In-person
Location: Hamilton, Berkeley Square, Elements

*ILR events/classes involving walking/hiking/exercise may be strenuous for some. Please use discretion when registering.


Leadership and its Impact on American International Relations

The course will initially discuss attributes which exemplify leadership—making a distinction between what constitutes a leader as compared to a manager, supervisor, or “boss.” The bulk of the course will discuss various major milestone events of the 20th and 21st centuries, how those events unfolded based on the decisions made at the time, and how leadership (or the lack thereof) may have been the determining factor in the outcome. Areas of consideration could include the following, based on student interest: WWI (International Alliances); WWII (U.S. neutrality leading to Pearl Harbor); Korea; Vietnam (Gulf of Tonkin); the fall of the Berlin Wall; Desert Storm; 9/11-Iraqi freedom/Afghanistan. The class will avoid political discussions other than those in an international historic context.

Instructors: Thomas Cooke retired from the Army as a Lieutenant Colonel in 2000. After serving as a Senior Communications Contractor, Mr. Cooke entered the civilian federal service with the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA) as Deputy Director of Public Affairs. He subsequently accepted various leadership positions to include NGA support to the Defense Intelligence Agency, Marine Corps Intelligence Activity, and the NGA Office of Global Support.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 9–10:15 a.m.
Format: In-person
Location: Oxford, Peabody Hall, Room 31


Renewing Our Constitutional Democracy

Our Constitution is a wonderful document; it focuses on creating the structure for a government that derives its powers from the consent of the governed. But it does not define HOW to govern; those rules are left to the members of Congress. However, too many of these rules have been designed to serve the interests of the members of Congress and their parties, not to serve the interests of the country. This course will explore the details of new rules that would define how citizens might prefer to be governed and how those Citizen Rules might be implemented.

Instructor: Robert Viney is a former Procter & Gamble Business Executive and Adjunct Professor at UC, and the author of American Turning Point–Repairing and Restoring Our Constitutional Republic.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 9–10:15 a.m.
Format: In-person
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 111


Ultracrepidarian Forum (Formerly Topics of Current Interest)

In this course, formerly known as “Topics of Current Interest,” your instructors will present factual point/counterpoint data to initiate discussion. They will select a topic for the first session; then the class will identify topics they want to discuss in subsequent sessions. The goal is to increase understanding of current topics of controversy and debate.

Instructors: Paul Allen is a member of the ILR Board of Directors, Curriculum Committee, and Tech Team. He is a retired U.S. Navy officer and Ohio civil servant who remains actively engaged in public and political issues. Dennis Johnson is a U.S. Air Force veteran and was the Director of Human Resources at McCullough-Hyde Hospital. Since his retirement, Dennis has been an active participant in the ILR program who enjoys exchanging ideas in an open, honest, and civil forum that encourages spirited robust debate.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 10:45 a.m.–noon
Format: In-person
Location: Oxford, Boyd Hall, Room 228


Mining the Golden Age of Broadway

We will continue our voyage through Broadway's Golden Age which includes masterpieces from Broadway veterans such as Cole Porter and Richard Rodgers, as well as shows from newcomers such as Lerner and Loewe, Jerry Herman, Stephen Sondheim, and Frank Loesser. Through discussion and film clips, we will enjoy Golden Age shows like South Pacific, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Guys and Dolls, and The King and I.

Instructor: Doug Iden is a big fan of musicals and enjoys discussing them with other devotees.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 10:45 a.m.–noon
Format: In-person
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 116


Here We Go a-Caroling! Christmas Carols of the British Isles

CANCELED

Get an early start to a “Happy Christmas” (as said in Merrie Olde England) with an exploration of the history of traditional, nonsecular Christmas carols from England, Cornwall, Scotland, and Wales, including the evolution of carol singing within various historic singing traditions. Hear carols that may be new to you, learn the stories behind specific carols and their authors and composers, and experience well-known carols but with different tunes from the British Isles.

Instructor: Michael Hieber, Professor Emeritus, has an avid interest in traditional congregational singing and history. Michael first taught for ILR in Fall 2021 about Welsh hymn singing.

4 Tuesdays: October 4–25; 10:45 a.m.–noon
Format: Virtual
Location: Online


Plants in the Bible

“On the third day of creation, God created plants, trees, and all manner of leafy vegetation by the word of His mouth” (Gen. 1.11-13). The Bible mentions trees and plants over 124 times. People used them for their buildings, food, and medicine in both the Old and New Testament. We will cover a few of those plants and their relationships with biblical personalities and events.

Instructors: Don and Betty Elworth are both lovers of nature and have been on many walks over the years. They appreciate seeing the trees and flowers in all their seasons.

1 Tuesday: November 1; 10:45 am–noon
Format: In-person
Location: Monroe, Mt. Pleasant Activity Building


Tuesday Brown Bag Lecture Series

Each week the Brown Bag Lecture series presents a speaker who will discuss a topic of interest and importance. While the lectures are independent, those registering are encouraged to attend the entire series. Join us for this ILR tradition.

October 4HomeFitDeborah Hall and her team are AARP Central Ohio volunteers trained to guide you in the many ways to stay safe while remaining in your home.

October 11Brain HealthSakinah Salahu-Din and Joyce Madison are AARP Central Ohio volunteers with experience speaking about brain health. NOTE: This lecture will be virtual, but presented on-screen for our in-person audience.

October 18Fraud–Identity TheftMike Kessler and his team are AARP Central Ohio volunteers with one to eight years of experience speaking about AARP issues.

October 25Two Days and One SuitcaseGabrielle Strand will share the true story of family and friendship during the years of the Japanese internment camps of WWII.

November 1The Ohio Indian WarsRebecca Johnson is the Director of the Center for Public History and a Professor at Northern Kentucky University. She has worked for the National Park Service Western Reserve Historical Society and recently the Delhi Historical Society.

Coordinator: Gabrielle Strand grew up in Liberty Township where she still resides today. She was a teacher for Lakota School District for 25 years and also taught in Southern California for several years. Since her retirement she has been a volunteer for several causes that benefit abused or neglected children.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 12:30–1:45 p.m.
Format: In-person
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 116


Our Electric Vehicle Future: Facts and Speculation

Sales of electric vehicles (EVs) are soaring. Carmakers are scrambling to create hundreds of new EV models. EVs will look and perform differently than our soon-to-disappear gas cars. Charging stations are quickly being installed along highways and even in Oxford. Battery technology is changing rapidly. If you took last year’s EV class, 90% of this term’s material is fresh, and the industry is changing so quickly that last year’s material is no longer current. If you didn’t take last year’s EV class, don’t worry. We will make sure everyone is up to speed.

Instructor: James Rubenstein is Professor Emeritus of Geography and a consultant on the auto industry at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 12:30–1:45 p.m.
Format: Virtual
Location: Online


(Re)Reading Thomas Pynchon’s V. at (Almost) 60

“The most masterful first novel in the history of literature”? Hyperbolic, surely; but that’s how the usually judicious critic Richard Poirier described Pynchon’s 1963 novel, V. In 1972, Miami’s own shooting star Ray Olderman called V. “the seminal novel of the sixties.” Is that closer to the mark? Does the novel still have that buzz? What buzz anyway? How well has V. (with its elements of the Gothic, the picaresque, the historical novel, the spy/detective novel, and more rolled into one) aged? Please read at least through chapter 4 for the first class.

Class Text: Pynchon, Thomas, V., any edition (older ones include Lippincott, 1963; Bantam, 1964; Modern Library, 1966; and HarperCollins, 1986). Current editions include a repaginated Harper Perennial (ISBN: 9780060930219) and Kindle or Nook Book (ISBN: 9781101594568)

Instructor: John M. Krafft, Miami Professor Emeritus of English, is coauthor of six essays analyzing the evolution of Pynchon’s V. from typescript to published novel.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 12:30–1:45 p.m.
Format: In-person
Location: Oxford, Boyd Hall, Room 228


Leading Causes of Disease Death in the U.S.

We will discuss the top leading causes of disease deaths in the U.S. in 2021 and their impact on our society. These diseases are heart disease; cancer; COVID-19; stroke; chronic lower respiratory diseases; Alzheimer’s disease; diabetes; chronic liver disease and cirrhosis; and kidney disease.

Instructor: John Stevenson, Professor Emeritus of Microbiology, retired in 2015 after 41 years of teaching and research focused on immunology and infectious diseases.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 2:15–3:30 p.m.
Format: Virtual
Location: Online


Woody Plants and How to Appreciate Them*

Have you ever wondered what kind of tree you were looking at or how many different kinds of trees there are in your area? Do you want to know the importance of native plants vs. alien plants or what invasive species means? These are some of the questions we expect to address. We will be walking outside for most of our time together so participants must be able to walk on uneven ground and stand for at least one hour.

Instructors: Karl Mattox is Professor Emeritus of Botany and former Dean of the College of Arts and Science. During his time in the botany department, he taught Trees and Shrubs many times. Ben Mattox is a retired biology and botany teacher. Most of his career was at Talawanda High School.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 2:15–3:30 p.m.
Format: In-person
Location: Oxford, Boyd Hall, Room 228

*ILR events/classes involving walking/hiking/exercise may be strenuous for some. Please use discretion when registering.


European Mysteries

In this course, various individuals will lead discussion sessions on an exciting selection of European mystery novels. Students are expected to read each book in advance of its discussion session. (This course was previously offered by Professor Mark Plageman).

October 4 – A Taste of VengeanceCarolyn Gard retired as a Senior Director of Academic Technology at Miami. She enjoyed this course in the past, and is excited for the opportunity to discuss storylines and settings with other mystery readers.

October 11Racing the DevilDavid Butler’s interest in European mysteries increased after taking a class from Professor Mark Plageman. He chose Charles Todd and his character, Ian Rutledge, because of Rutledge’s complex history in WWI and his persistent imaginary voice, a former soldier named Hamish.

October 18Death and the MaidenDennis Sullivan appreciates how many European mysteries provide insight into their setting, which is why he chose a mystery set in Vienna, a city he knows and loves.

October 25A Dead Man in TriesteThomas Gard chose this book because it captures the history and culture of Trieste, Italy, the European city where he has spent the most time.

November 1 – Postmortem book discussion and book suggestions for the spring

Class Texts: Martin Walker, A Taste of Vengeance, Knopf, 2018, ISBN-10: 0525519963; Charles Todd, Racing the Devil, William Morrow, 2017, ISBN-10: 0062386212, ISBN-13: 978-0062386212; Frank Tallis, Death and the Maiden, Random House Trade Paperbacks, 2012, ISBN: 9780812983340; Michael Pearce, A Dead Man in Trieste, Carroll & Graf, 2004, ISBN-10: 0786714654, ISBN-13: 978-0786714650

Coordinator: Thomas Gard is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics from the University of Georgia.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 2:15–3:30 p.m.
Format: In-person
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 111


Western European Wine Regions II

This course is an exploration of Western European wine regions through the study of geography, soil, climate, grapes, and more. We will discuss the impact of the arts and important wine personalities as well as commercialization efforts to bring the wine to market. Indeed, we will also enjoy wine tastings from each region. The regions and wines will be different from those we sampled in the previous class.

Instructors: Nicholas Gantenberg was a research scientist at the NIH and corporate R&D labs. He is the Wine Director for The Spicy Olive. Melanie Cedargren is the owner and operator of The Spicy Olive, an original tasting emporium for fresh olive oils, balsamic vinegars, and fine wines.

5 Tuesdays: October 4–November 1; 4–5:15 p.m.
Format: Hybrid
Location: Online or Oxford LaRosa’s
Supply fee: $63.00, paid on the first day of class