Wednesday Courses

Registration for Fall '22 Opening Soon!

Join us this fall, October 3 through November 4, for another blockbuster semester. 

ILR fall semester registration opens September 1st , 9 a.m.

Elder Law: Protecting Life’s Savings and Quality of Life

Learn the basics of Medicaid, changes in Medicare, and how to protect finances and quality of life in a long-term care setting. Learn how to review your wills, trusts, beneficiary forms, and power of attorney documents to make sure they are in line with your wishes and that they are thorough enough to get you through the elder care continuum.

Instructor: Dennison Keller is President of the Life Care Planning Law Firm Association and the former President of the Ohio Forum of Estate Planning Attorneys. He is a former anchor/reporter for WKRC-TV Local 12.

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 9–10:15 a.m.
Format: In-person
Location: Oxford, Peabody Hall, Room 31


Not all Hoof or Howl: The Work of Mojave Poet Natalie Diaz

Once a professional women’s basketball player, Diaz is a McArthur Genius grant recipient, a linguist preserver of the Mojave language, and a professor at Arizona State University. She won the National Book Award for her first book, When My Brother was an Aztec, in 2012 and the Pulitzer Prize for her second collection, Postcolonial Love Poem, in 2020. We’ll read and talk about parts of her two collections and some of their contexts. Diaz’s work will ask us to pivot our personal and political centers to the world view of a Mojave, Latinx woman. The course emphasis will be on a running conversation; but, if asked, Barb will pass on some interpretive opinion along the way.

Class Text: Natalie Diaz, When My Brother Was an Aztec, Copper Canyon Press, 2012, ISBN: 978-1-55659-383-3; Natalie Diaz, Postcolonial Love Poem, Graywolf Press, 2020, ISBN: 978-1-64445-014-7

Instructor: Oxford resident Barbara Caruso spent 39 years teaching in the Literature, African American and Women’s Studies Programs at Earlham College.

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 9–10:15 a.m.
Format: Virtual
Location: Online


Exploring Common Orthopedic Problems with the Experts

Most of us have experienced various orthopedic problems over the years, including problems in our bones and joints that limit our ability to stay active and engaged. Many of us have visited the doctor or therapist to fix these problems. In this series, offered in collaboration with U.C.’s OLLI program, we have invited six orthopedic surgeon educators from the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Cincinnati to discuss some of these common problems and how they are diagnosed, treated, and possibly avoided.

October 5Bone Infection (Osteomyelitis)H. Claude Sagi is Professor and Executive Vice Chair, Director, Division of Trauma.

October 12The Shoulder: What are CTA and RSA?Brian Grawe is an Associate Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery.

October 19Atypical Femur Fractures and OsteoporosisMichael Beltran is Associate Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery.

October 26Metastatic Bone DiseaseMichael Archdeacon is Department Chair and Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs.

November 2Bone Loss and Making New Bone by DistractionJohn Wyrick is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery.

November 9Back and Neck Pain: Everything You Want to KnowFerhan Asghar is Professor and Vice Chair of Academic Affairs.

Coordinator: David Butler is Professor Emeritus of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Cincinnati.

6 Wednesdays: October 5–November 9; 9–10:15 a.m.
Format: Virtual
Location: Online
NOTE: Course extends post-term


QPR Suicide Prevention Training

Just as CPR helps anyone save a life in a medical emergency, QPR (Question-Persuade-Refer) is a simple educational program that teaches ordinary citizens how to recognize a mental health emergency and get persons at risk the help they need. This can be viewed as a bystander intervention program allowing anyone to benefit from this training. Goals of QPR Gatekeeper Training include educating participants on the myths and facts associated with suicide; the warning signs of suicide and contributing causes; how to Question, Persuade, and Refer someone who may be suicidal; and sharing resources available to help someone in crisis.

Instructor: Kristen Smith is a Prevention Specialist for Envision Partnerships as Chair of the Butler County Suicide Prevention Coalition. She is also a trained QPR Gatekeeper Training Instructor and coordinates training efforts in the county.

1 Wednesday: October 19; 10:30 a.m.–noon
Format: In-person
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 100


Better Together: Oil and Vinegar

This two-session course will cover the myths and truths surrounding olive oil and balsamic vinegar. We will begin by examining misconceptions that are presented as truth about olive oil. We will also talk about the importance and health benefits of fresh olive oil. In week two, we will explore balsamic vinegars, how they are made, and their unique health benefits. The class will close with a demo of how to use olive oils and balsamic vinegars to make a vinaigrette, other uses, and will allow attendees to taste and try some fresh olive oils and balsamic vinegars.

Instructor: Melanie Cedargren, owner of The Spicy Olive, celebrates her 10th year in business in 2022. She is a level 1 sommelier and has completed level 1 and 2 sensory evaluations of olive oil at the University of California, Davis Robert Mondavi Institute.

2 Wednesdays: October 5–12; 10:45 a.m.–noon
Format: In-person
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 100
Supply Fee: $5.00, paid on the first day of class


Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health

Tai Chi and Qi Gong for Health is an introductory course that will include Qi Gong warm up exercises. Short videos include “What is Tai Chi?” and “Meridian Qi Gong”; learning a short Tai Chi form called “Five Elements”; how health is affected by influencing “chi” through stimulating meridians or acupressure points. Most activities will be retrievable via downloadable videos (links provided in class). Viewing outside of class will be encouraged with weekly video resources.

Instructor: Dr. Larry C. Bobbert, founder of Tai Chi Village, has more than 50 years of martial arts experience and has presented in 35 states and on four continents.

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 10:45 a.m.–noon
Format: In-person
Location: Monroe, Mt. Pleasant, Activity Building


Life Under the Microscope

Magnification has allowed scientists to learn an ever-increasing amount about what it is to be living. This is an ongoing process, a system of investigation. We will give you the opportunity and skills to use multiple kinds of microscopes in this class and look at many kinds of organisms.

Instructors: Karl Mattox is Professor Emeritus of Botany and former Dean of Arts and Science. During his time as a botany professor, his area of research was the evolution of algae to land plants. He is an expert in microscopy. Ben Mattox is a retired biology and botany teacher. He taught most of his career at Talawanda High School. Microscope labs were among his favorite days throughout his career.

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 10:45 a.m.–noon
Format: In-person
Location: Oxford, Upham Hall, Room 100, Hefner Museum


Analyzing Costume in Film

Costumes are critical in defining context and identifying characters in period films. We will explore the costuming of five different films: Pride and Prejudice; Gone with the Wind; Victoria; The Age of Innocence; and Downton Abbey. The actual dress of each time period will be reviewed, clips of the films will be shown, and the designer’s approach to costuming will be discussed. Together we will evaluate the success of the costumes in each film. You do not need to have seen the films to learn from the class and to participate in the discussion.

Instructor: Sara Butler is Professor Emerita of Art. She is the Curator of the Costume Collection at the Butler County Historical Society and is on the boards of BCHS and ILR.

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 10:45 a.m.–noon
Format: Virtual
Location: Online


Joyce's Ulysses

A century after its publication in 1922, Ulysses by James Joyce remains one of the comic masterpieces in all of literature. Focused on Stephen Dedalus, a young teacher with ambitions of writing, and on Leopold and Molly Bloom, a couple with marital tensions but a raucous sense of humor, Ulysses was published by Sylvia Beach and her Shakespeare and Company bookstore. Joyce wrote outrageously funny scenes set in an outhouse, a Turkish bath, pubs, a hotel restaurant, a seaside park, and a brothel.

Class Text: James Joyce, Ulysses: The Gabler Edition, Vintage, a Division of Random House, 1986, ISBN: 978-0-394-74312-7

Instructor: As an alumnus (class of 1975) of Miami University, John Beall taught English in secondary school from 1979-2020 in Dallas, Texas; Canterbury, England; and New York City. Currently retired from teaching, he remains an active scholar and poet.

6 Wednesdays: October 5–November 9; 12:30–1:45 pm
Format: Virtual
Location: Online
NOTE: Course extends post-term


Wednesday Brown Bag Lecture Series

Relax and enjoy hats off to you, a baseball icon, digging for dinosaurs, an artist's story, and beautiful nature. While the lectures are independent, those registering are encouraged to attend the entire series. Join us for this ILR tradition.

October 5YES! Even You Can Be a Hat Person!Mary Ward and Virginia Rapp are Ohio fiber artists who offer one-of-a-kind hats at their store, Two Stitches Millinery. Their diverse collection features a variety of millinery techniques including flat-pattern styling, wood-blocking, wet and needle felting, and crochet/knit focused on high-end materials.

October 12Joe Nuxhall: The Old Lefthander and MeJohn Kiesewetter, who published a book last year with the same title as this lecture, tells some of his and Joe’s favorite stories about the late Reds radio announcer and former pitcher. After working 40 years at the Cincinnati Enquirer as a reporter, editor, and TV columnist, John joined Cincinnati Public Radio’s WVXU-FM in 2015.

October 19Everything You’ve Always Wanted to Know About Finding a Dinosaur (But Were Afraid to Ask)Steve Bodi is the founder of Southern Indiana Paleontology Institute and leads field expeditions to discover and excavate fossil dinosaurs. Some specimens will be available to examine up close and maybe even hold.

October 26Christina’s World: The Story Behind the Famous Andrew Wyeth PaintingMarian Fisher began her oil painting career in 2008 and is currently a member of the Women’s Art Club of Cincinnati. Her goals as a teacher are for her students to learn art techniques and enjoy the experience.

November 2Wild About WildlifeErnie Martin is a long-time active member of the West Chester Photo Club and is certified as a judge by the Photographic Society of America. Whether at the Cincinnati Zoo, where he is a volunteer educator, or Africa, or one of our National Parks, photographing wildlife and other gifts of nature is his passion.

Coordinator: Marlene Esseck is a retired educator from the Lakota Local School District.

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 12:30–1:45 p.m.
Format: In-person
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 116


Metaphysics

In modern philosophy this is the study of God, freedom, and immortality. All three have been questioned by the rise of modern science and need continual new thinking to remain relevant to living well. The method of metaphysics is dialectic, which requires participation in the discussion.

Instructor: Jack Sommer taught philosophy at Miami University, Western College, and short appointments at several other schools. His experience includes two years with the Army engineers during the Korean War and many years writing a book, Moments of Soul, An Inquiry into Personal Attraction, in which he tries to understand the mind, personal identity, honor, and faith, all connected and dependent on our need for others.

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 12:30–1:45 p.m.
Format: In-person
Location: Knolls of Oxford, Clubhouse


Rising Consciousness: Brain and Mind

We will investigate the neuroscience underlying behavior and consciousness in both non-human animals and people. Animals such as octopuses, elephants, dolphins, and non-human primates have behaviors complex enough to be called “minds.” Human consciousness relies upon brain structures that interact with each other, recently revealed by new scanning technologies. Learning and language are particularly significant in defining humans as a species, as well as shaping religion, politics, mental gifts, and illnesses. While lectures draw mostly from biology and history, our conversations will have implications for questions of human origins, diversity, and culture.

Instructor: Muriel Blaisdell is Professor Emerita of Interdisciplinary Studies and History. Her interests include the history of science, biology, and society.

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 2:15–3:30 p.m.
Format: Hybrid
Location: Online or Oxford, Boyd Hall, Room 217


Around the World One Plate at a Time

Travel with us around the world as we teach you how to prepare meals from five different countries: Italy, Mexico, Germany, China, and America (gotta have that comfort food!). You will leave each class with the knowledge to prepare an entrée and dessert from that week's session. Buy your plane tickets now, and join us on our journey around the world.

Instructors: Phil New is Director of Culinary and Nutritional Services at Ohio Living Mount Pleasant. Phil has 25 years of experience in fine dining and catering for retirement communities. Adam Lupp is Assistant Director of culinary services. Prior to working at Ohio Living Mount Pleasant, Adam worked in a full-service modern Italian restaurant for 10 years.

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 2:15–3:30 p.m.
Format: In-person
Location: Monroe, Mt. Pleasant Activity Building


The Inventors, Moguls, and Men of Industry from Dayton, Ohio

The airplane, the automobile, the Wright brothers, the National Cash Register company and so much more. Come hear about the men who put Dayton, Ohio, on the map and explore the businesses that made the Gem City bright.

Instructors: Deb Price has previously moderated classes for both ILR and the University of Cincinnati’s OLLI program. Caryl Miller has taught numerous classes for OLLI and ILR, many on history-related topics.

4 Wednesdays: October 5–26; 2:15–3:30 p.m.
Format: In-person
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 116


Viva Verdi!

We will present five operas by the great Italian composer of the 19th century, Giuseppe Verdi: Nabucco, Rigoletto, Il Trovatore, La Traviata, and Aïda. All are still produced frequently, but if you are new to opera you might like to learn something about their composition histories and initial receptions, as well as enjoy the glorious music of the wonderful arias and choruses with other ILR opera lovers.

Instructors: Anne Morris-Hooke, Professor Emerita of Microbiology, has a lifelong passion for opera and loves to share her favorites with ILR friends. Professor Andrea Ridilla teaches oboe and opera appreciation at Miami University. She is the author of an online textbook on opera appreciation, Opera: Passport to the Liberal Arts. She plays in orchestras and gives oboe concerts all over the world.

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 4–5:15 p.m.
Format: Virtual
Location: Online


The HeART of Making Photographs

Making photographs of family, travel destinations, or one's backyard are enhanced by compositional skills. Whether taken with a phone or a digital single-lens reflex camera, photographs capture stories and moments large and small. Using both online and hands-on formats, participants will see examples and make photographs targeted to specific compositional skills. A private Facebook group will allow participants to post pictures and give and receive feedback. This class will meet online for four weeks; the fifth week may be online or onsite at a photography location, depending on interests of the group.

Instructor: Barbara Rose is a retired Miami professor whose longtime passion is photography. Examples of her place-based and story-based photography can be viewed at https://bjandersonrose.myportfolio.com

5 Wednesdays: October 5–November 2; 4–5:15 p.m.
Format: Virtual
Location: Online