Global Miami Plan Foundation Descriptions and Student Learning Outcomes

Students in a tai-chi class in McGuffey.

Global Miami Plan Foundation Descriptions and Student Learning Outcomes

MPF I—Composition

1. Rhetorical Knowledge

Demonstrate an ability to write effectively for different contexts, audiences, purposes, and genres, while in the meantime, develop an understanding of how rhetorical devices and moves work to enhance writings on specific communicative situations.

2. Composing Processes

Develop effective strategies for developing ideas, researching topics, producing drafts, revising, peer responding, editing, and proofreading. Practice delivering writing via both print and digital media.

3. Inquiry, Invention, and Research

Ask critical questions, conduct research-based inquiries, and use invention techniques effectively to explore ideas, engage differing perspectives, and synthesize findings into sustained arguments or narratives. Learn to locate, evaluate, integrate, and cite secondary sources of information effectively and ethically.

4. Writing Technologies

Demonstrate a critical awareness of the affordances and limitations of the diverse writing technologies and modalities of communication, both digital and non-digital. Learn to effectively produce, share, and publish your writing by using appropriate technologies of production, editing, commenting, delivery, and sharing.

5. Reflection and Mega-Cognitive Awareness

Apply concepts and terms from the field of rhetoric and composition to reflect critically on composing practices and rhetorical decisions, especially writing are shaped by and shaping your communities/identities, audiences, and the writing technologies in use.

MPF IIA—Creative Arts

  1. Employ principals, terminology, and methods from disciplines in the arts in a global context.

  2. Recognize and investigate the complex blend of imaginative vision, socio-cultural context, ethical values, and aesthetic judgment in creative work, thought, and practice, both past and current.

  3. Engage in the creative process while embracing a culture of innovation and change in the visual, spatial, and performing arts.

  4. Illustrate and reflect on verbal and non-verbal communication during creative artistic processes.

MPF IIB—Humanities

  1. Apply creative thinking, critical and theoretical reasoning, and/or ethical understanding in the scholarly investigation of ideas, texts, and people who shape human cultures.

  2. Develop literary, historical, cinematic, cultural, philosophical, and/or linguistic analyses.

  3. Interpret local and global issues from diverse perspectives, with consideration of one's own place and potential influence in the world.

MPF IIC—Social Science

  1. Investigate human behavior, social relationships, and/or the interactions of people with their cultural, social and political environments.

  2. Examine social phenomena including distinct human communities, political processes and structures, interpersonal and intercultural relationships, economic behaviors, psychological phenomena, and the relationships that discrete human populations have with other subnational, national, or international entities.

  3. Explain the primary theoretical approaches used in the social science discipline.

  4. Analyze the primary quantitative and/or qualitative research methods used in social science discipline.

  5. Discuss the primary ethical issues raised by the practices and findings of the social science discipline.

MPF IIIB Global Perspectives

These categories comprise courses or a series of courses focused on themes or issues relevant to the globalized society in which we all live, asking us to situate subject matter and skills relevant that subject in terms of their global implications. Through their work in these courses, students begin to develop and exercise the ability to communicate and act respectfully across linguistic and cultural differences; explore and understand their place and influence in the changing world; determine and assess relationships among societies, institutions, and systems in terms of reciprocal – though not necessarily symmetrical – interactions, benefits, and costs; describe the development and construction of differences and similarities among contemporary groups and regions; and identify and analyze the origins and influences of global forces. All MPF III Global Perspectives courses must meet the goal:to develop and exercise the ability to communicate and act respectfully across linguistic and cultural differences,and at least 2 of the following goals.

  1. Explore and understand place and influence in the changing world.

  2. Determine and assess relationships among societies, institutions, and systems in terms of reciprocal – though not necessarily symmetrical – interactions, benefits, and costs.

  3. Describe the development and construction of differences and similarities among contemporary groups and regions.

  4. Identify and analyze the origins and influences of global forces.

MPF IVA—Biological Science

Biological sciences involve the study of living organisms, including their origin, composition, function (molecular, cellular, and organismal) diversity, classification, ecology, evolution, and behavior. Life forms studied by biologists include Eukarya (animals, plants, fungi, and protists), Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses.

  1. Understand the basic facts, principals, theories and methods of modern science.

  2. Explain how scientific principals are formulated, evaluated, and either modified or validated.

  3. Critically evaluate current models and ideas in order to describe, explain, or predict natural phenomena.

  4. Apply scientific methods of inquiry appropriate to the discipline to gather data and draw evidence-based conclusions.

  5. Distinguish between science and technology and recognize the role of science in everyday life.

  6. Recognize that new advances can change scientific understanding and that it is critical to constantly evaluate information from a variety of sources.

MPF IVB—Physical Science

Physical Science comprise the disciplines that study the nature of energy and the inorganic world. It is traditionally subdivided into four general areas: chemistry, physics, astronomy, and earth sciences.

  1. Understand the basic facts, principals, theories and methods of modern science.

  2. Explain how scientific principals are formulated, evaluated, and either modified or validated.

  3. Critically evaluate current models and ideas in order to describe, explain, or predict natural phenomena.

  4. Apply scientific methods of inquiry appropriate to the discipline to gather data and draw evidence-based conclusions.

  5. Distinguish between science and technology and recognize the role of science in everyday life.

  6. Recognize that new advances can change scientific understanding and that it is critical to constantly evaluate information from a variety of sources.

MPF V—Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, Technology

After completing the courses in this area, the students should be able to apply mathematical reasoning to problem solving and pattern finding at the inductive level, or formal and abstract reasoning at the deductive level, or a combination of both forms of arguments. Students will also explore the role of formal reasoning in history, society, and the modern world, and to reflect upon its use in formulating well-founded, ethical decisions.

  1. Learn to improve in the ability to develop logical arguments.

  2. Explore the logical and systemic methodology used by mathematicians to examine and explore concepts, such as quantity, space, probability, structure, and the study of motions and shapes of physical objects.

  3. Begin a formal introduction to logic and methodolgies used in deriving conclusions.

  4. Investigate concepts of truth, proof, meaning, and their role in informing and influencing our perceptions, imagination, thought processes, and learned experience.

  5. Apply the technical professional's methodology, including the evaluation of empirical data, problem recognition and definition, and the application of scientific principals.

Cultures Requirement (for students entering before Fall, 2015)

These courses use the United States and/or other regions of the world as points of departure to encourage students to view the diversity of societies and the issues raised by their diversity. Diversity is broadly defined and may include disability, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, language or class, but is certainly not limited to these groups. In addition to acquiring knowledge about cultural diversity, students will examine the nature of societies’ ideas concerning others, how ideas about others are developed, the significance of these ideas when interacting with others, and the importance of analysis and evidence when making judgments.

Historical Perspective (for students entering before Fall, 2015)

Courses that meet this requirement explore particular historical contexts to help students expand their understanding of how we humans have acted and could act, of how we made decisions in different situations, and how we can interpret the same event in different ways.