Consumer Information

Student Loan Cohort Default Rate

A cohort default rate is the percentage of a school's borrowers who enter repayment on certain Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program or William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program loans during a particular federal fiscal year (FY). The U.S. Department of Education releases official cohort default rates once per year.

Student Loan Cohort Default Rate
FY 2016 FY 2015 FY 2014
Miami University 7.4% 8% 10.6%
Ohio 11.1% 12.2% 13.6%
National 10.1% 10.8% 11.5%

Source: U.S. Dept of Education

Cost of Attendance

Miami University provides student aid calculators to assist in early financial planning for college. These calculators will provide a preliminary estimate of federal and institutional financial aid eligibility.

Ohio Department of Higher Education Educator Preparation Performance Report

To continuously improve the quality of educator preparation programs in Ohio, Ohio Revised Code 3333.048 requires the Chancellor of Higher Education and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to establish and publish metrics for institutions of higher education that prepare educators and other school personnel. 

Federal Title II Report on the Quality of Teacher Preparation at Miami University

Title II of the federal Higher Education Act requires annual reports on the quality of teacher preparation. The reports provide information on a number of measures including enrollment, clinical experiences, licensure test pass rates, and other measures.

Accreditation

The teacher education programs are accredited by the Council of the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). CAEP was formed when Miami University’s previous accrediting body, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), merged with the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) in 2013.  Initial accreditation was through NCATE.

Program Goals

General Education and Special Education

Early Childhood and Middle Childhood

Our program provides general education Early Childhood Education (ECE) and Middle Childhood Education (MCE) completers with experiences in a variety of school /community settings, including at least three different field placements that serve in various intersections: high poverty populations of children and families, urban populations, rural/suburban populations, and, for some completers, children and families who are English language learners (ELLs). The program, via several school/community partnerships, works closely with the schools and communities to determine shared needs that will impact decisions and commitments that new teachers must consider. These commitments include knowledge of the community and how it serves the needs of children and families; completers are thus required to build awareness of the complexities of needs specific to the community served by their host school, and learn community supports in place to meet those needs. Each faculty member who teaches in the field-based semester makes site visits to host classrooms and communities and so, are prepared to provide completers with strategies and content that support their understanding specific to their site-based experiences. As required by the state of Ohio and our accreditation organization, completers are prepared to provide Program Assurances instruction in core academic subjects through both general education courses provided by the university’s College of Arts and Sciences, and through courses in pedagogy and curriculum--including 12 hours of literacy instruction coursework and courses in math, science, and social studies—provided by departments in the College of Education, Health and Society. Toward preparation to provide instruction to students with disabilities, each general education ECE/MCE completer is required to take two courses provided by the Department of Education Psychology: EDP 201: Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts; EDP 256: Psychology of the Exceptional Learner; and for ECE students, the additional course EDP 495E: Inclusion and Adaptations for Mild/Moderate and Gifted Needs: Early Childhood. MCE majors take the additional course EDP 301M, Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings.

Adolescent Young Adult

The Adolescent Young Adult (AYA) Education program prepares completers to teach in diverse classroom settings. Our program provides completers with experiences in a variety of school/community settings, including at least three different field placements that serve, in various intersections: urban populations (e.g., Middletown city schools, Hamilton city schools); rural populations (e.g., Talawanda School District); and populations with English Language Learners (ELLs). The program, via several school/community partnerships, works closely with the schools and communities to determine shared needs that will impact decisions and commitments that new teachers must consider. These commitments include knowledge of the community and how it serves the needs of children and families; completers are thus required to build awareness of the complexities of needs specific to the community served by their host school, and learn community supports in place to meet those needs. Each faculty member who teaches in the field-based semester makes site visits to host classrooms and communities and so, are prepared to provide completers with strategies and content that support their understanding specific to their site-based experiences. As required by the state of Ohio and our accreditation organization, completers are prepared to provide instruction in core academic subjects through both general education courses provided by the university’s Colleges of Arts and Sciences, and through courses in pedagogy and curriculum---including 6 hours of literacy-based instruction coursework (EDT 446A---Integrated Literacy Across Content Areas; EDT 323--TELLs Instructional Theories and Practices), and significant content-based coursework in candidates’ chosen area of study (e.g., mathematics, science, social studies [history, geography, psychology], global languages, English)—provided by departments in various colleges across campus.

Inclusive Special Education

In 2018, our ISE program began requiring teacher candidates to obtain dual licensure in moderate to intensive disabilities in addition to mild to moderate disabilities, in response to the identified needs of area educational agencies. These needs were determined during a focus group comprised of local hiring and special education directors, who indicated a significant shortage of candidates qualified to teach young people with moderate to intensive needs. The individuals participating in the focus group also assisted in the revision of Key Assessments required for program completion. Preparation is closely linked with the needs of schools and the instructional decisions new teachers face in the classroom. Because of the diversity of service delivery in our field, as of 2018, our ISE teacher candidates spend three semesters in major practica before student teaching, each in three different local districts. These practica require the equivalent of two full days in the classroom each week. Each practicum is carefully aligned with the content of methods courses taken during that semester and supervised by full-time faculty. These faculty collaborate with teachers and administrators to develop assignments aligned with both the needs of schools and the instructional decisions new teachers face in the classroom. Consistency among faculty teaching these courses from year to year have resulted in deeper partnerships that are continuously evolving to meet the needs of both the school and the teacher candidates. One practicum is in general education, one in mild to moderate disabilities, and one in moderate to intensive disabilities, so students are likely to be exposed to co-teaching, inclusion, pull-out, and self-contained settings. Prospective special education teachers are prepared in core academic subjects and to instruct in core academic subjects. Our ISE program requires two courses in the mathematics department designed to provide a theoretical basis for mathematics instruction in elementary settings. Mathematics methods are also integrated into Methods I and Methods II courses. Four reading courses are required across general and special education, in order to obtain a broader view of reading acquisition and application, both typical and atypical. Four specialized methods courses provide both breadth and depth of knowledge in methods to teach across content area in mild to intensive disabilities, K-12. The general education practicum that students take during their junior year ensures exposure to general education curriculum and pedagogy in local classroom settings. Our Inclusive Special Education Program teaches a core course, EDP 256, Psychology of Learners with Exceptionalities, that every education major is required to take to support future educators in teaching students with disabilities effectively. This comprehensive course prepares our teacher candidates to understand services, trends, issues, laws, procedures, and methods specific to special education, and is aligned with Ohio TAG standards. In addition, all early childhood majors take EDP495e, Inclusion and Adaptations for Mild/Moderate and Gifted Needs: Early Childhood. This course addresses instruction on adapting curriculum, methods, and materials for young children with mild/moderate exceptionalities and/or giftedness in inclusive settings. It also emphasizes adaptations in reading, math, social studies, science, and language arts, as developmentally and culturally appropriate for early childhood (ages 3 - 8). Within this course, the procedure to determine whether a student has a disability, as well as eligibility for services, is addressed. This process involves the general educator’s role in the evaluation process and development of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The students are exposed to sample IEP’s and are able to interpret these documents and the implications for academic adaptations. Prospective general education teachers are prepared to provide instruction to limited English proficient students. Multicultural education and culturally responsive pedagogy is a large focal point and current theme in EDP 256. Additionally, in this course all education majors learn about the needs and characteristics of English language learners and are taught to be able to demonstrate knowledge of general curricula and evidence-based strategies to differentiate instruction for all learners. Courses within the ISE program focus on addressing the needs of all learners including students who have limited English proficiency. These strategies are integrated into methods and assessment courses. Prospective general education teachers are prepared to provide instruction to students from low-income families. In EDP 256, focusing on culturally responsive teaching allows all education majors to identify collaborative methods for working with families, other educators, related service providers, individuals with exceptionalities, and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the needs of diverse learners. Students are also taught to be able to describe the principles of an individualized, safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environment. Lastly, students in EDP 256 critically examine issues and trends in the definition and identification of culturally diverse learners with exceptionalities, including disproportionate representation. Prospective teachers are prepared to effectively teach in urban and rural schools, as applicable. As Miami is situated between rural and urban spaces, our teachers are intentionally placed in districts throughout their practicum experiences to have exposure to a spectrum of school settings. Our students’ general education placement occurs through a partnership with a neighboring urban district, their mild/moderate placement occurs through a partnership with a district who supports both rural and suburban students, their moderate/intensive placement occurs across rural, urban, and suburban placements, and their student teaching placements occur across settings as well. In addition, culturally responsive teaching practices are grounded in the philosophy of our special education program and our students have a key assessment in culturally responsive pedagogy programs.

Teaching Students with Disabilities

Early Childhood 

We prepare general educators to teach students with disabilities effectively, most directly in required course, EDP495e, Inclusion and Adaptations for Mild/Moderate and Gifted Needs: Early Childhood. This course addresses instruction on adapting curriculum, methods, and materials for young children with mild/moderate exceptionalities and/or giftedness in inclusive settings. It also emphasizes adaptations in reading, math, social studies, science, and language arts, as developmentally and culturally appropriate for early childhood (ages 3 - 8). Within this course, the procedure to determine whether a student has a disability, as well as eligibility for services, is addressed. This process involves the general educator’s role in the evaluation process and development of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The students are exposed to sample IEPs and are able to interpret these documents and the implications for academic adaptations.

Middle Childhood and Adolescent Young Adult

We prepare general educators to teach students with disabilities effectively, most directly in required course, EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner. This course addresses instruction on adapting curriculum, methods, and materials for adolescent learners with mild/moderate exceptionalities and/or giftedness in inclusive settings. It also emphasizes adaptations in specific content areas—English Language Arts, Social Studies, Mathematics, and Global Languages—as developmentally and culturally appropriate for middle level (grades 4-9) and adolescent learners (grades 7-12). Within this course, the procedure to determine whether a student has a disability, as well as eligibility for services, is addressed. This process involves the general educator’s role in the evaluation process and development of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The students are exposed to sample IEPs and are able to interpret these documents and the implications for academic adaptations.

Inclusive Special Education

Our students engage in: high leverage teaching practices; lesson study (noticing, evaluating, and describing good teaching); senior capstone experience tutoring students with disabilities; and multiple field experiences beginning their first semester in the program. Our students engage in: a TR/IEP team meeting simulation during their sophomore year in partnership with speech pathology majors and graduate students in the school psychologist program; IEP preparation and revision projects in EDP 468, EDP 486, and EDP 491; and participation in actual IEP/ETR meetings during EDP 459 G and F, MCE field placement, and student teaching.

Teaching Student with Limited English Proficiency

PK - 12

In preparing our completers to teach students who are English Language Learners (ELLs), we actively seek placements for completers in schools that serve children and families who are limited English proficient; however, not all completers are included in that experience. Some required courses include attention to teaching children who are ELLs, however, this inclusion depends on who is teaching the course; it is not institutionalized. We are actively revising our ECE program (new program commencing Fall 2020) to include a course that is currently an optional course: EDT 323, Teaching English Language Learners (ELL) in PK-12: Theories and Practices. This course provides instructional foundations for teaching ELLs, and includes a field experience, comprehensive case study assignments, enabling teachers to engage in understanding the instructional and assessment concerns facing ELLs and their teachers in schools. All students enrolled in the Adolescent Young Adult (AYA) Program is required to complete EDT 323---TELLs Instructional Theories and Practices. This course provides instructional foundations for teaching ELLs, and includes a field experience, comprehensive case study assignments, enabling teachers to engage in understanding the instructional and assessment concerns facing ELLs and their teachers in school.

At Miami University, we offer a TESOL Endorsement (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages); however, students in this program already hold an initial teaching license. TESOL prepares P-12 educators to work effectively with English language learners. Our courses provide real-world understanding and practical strategies to address the linguistic, cultural and academic issues facing English language learners and their teachers in schools. The TESOL endorsement is a four-course sequence designed to meet the needs of practicing teachers who work with English Language Learners. The program has been designed to be completed in one academic year, by taking two courses a semester, starting in fall. It can also, however, be completed at a more sedate pace by taking one course a semester. In that case the ideal sequence would be EDT 612 in the fall, then EDT 614 in the spring, then EDT 618 in fall 2, and EDT 616 in spring 2. If interested in starting the endorsement in the spring, teachers should select EDT 614, as EDT 616 is the culminating experience and should be taken after all other courses have been completed.

Technology

Basic IT

The College of Education, Health, and Society has its own IT staff who provide a wide variety of technical support services for the benefit of our students, faculty, and staff. Classrooms are equipped with integrated computer and media systems including a projector, Windows computer, VHS/DVD unit, document camera, and Starboard screen. These classroom systems also enable an instructor to use USB jump drives/storage devices and plug their laptop into the system to take advantage of the projector and media system. We continually work to update and enhance our instructional spaces to allow for the highest level of technological integration.

Engaging Technology Lab (ETL)

The Engaging Technology Lab (ETL) is a state-of-the-art lab used by students and faculty, both independently and collaboratively, to explore how technology can transform teaching and learning. The lab is designed to help students become technology pioneers in their fields and to learn to make games that can make a difference in someone's life. Students and faculty have a wide range of resources for research and digital creation.

TeachLive

TeachLIVE is a mixed-reality teaching environment that supports teacher practice in pedagogy and content. In the TLE TeachLivE™ Lab, pre-service and in-service teachers walk into a simulated middle-school classroom where the room is real but the students are digital avatars. The virtual students controlled by real trainers are made to act like typical (or atypical) pre-teens, depending on the objectives of the experience. Each student’s personality is based upon those typically encountered in a middle school classroom. What are the benefits? In the traditional teaching environment, we make use of real students to help novice teachers become better educators. In a virtual teaching environment, novice teachers can make mistakes without impacting real students, and they can repeat the experience until they become effective educators. For teacher candidates who have what it takes but also have plenty to learn about teaching in practice, the TLE TeachLivE™ affords them the perfect environment in which to make mistakes and improve.

Anatomage

The Anatomage table offers a unique, life-size virtual dissection table with an unprecedented realistic visualization of 3D anatomy and interactivity. Clinical Professor Dean Smith notes that at this time, EHS has the only Anatomage table in Ohio. “This instrument provides a learning tool rarely available to undergrads outside of medical schools,” notes Smith.

METIman

METIman is a patient simulator that can be programmed to display a variety of health conditions ranging from allergic reactions, pneumonia, heart conditions and various symptoms of trauma. Students can monitor MetiMan’s pulse, heartbeat, respirations, pupil dilation and other physiological factors. While METIman is a powerful learning tool for athletic training students, other majors can also benefit from working with the life-like technology. One of the unique features of Meti-Man is that the "patient’s" symptoms can accelerate if a student is not using the correct treatment. The plan is to videotape these student-patient sessions so that students may review what they might have done differently to gain more positive results. This kind of experimentation is invaluable as students prepare for real-world scenarios.

Digital Backpack

The EHS digital backpack project provides student teachers with access to high-tech equipment such as Smartboards ™ and video cameras to use in classrooms where this technology is not available. The project, introduced in the 2009-10 academic year, has been used successfully in schools throughout Ohio as well as by students doing their student teaching internationally.