Wednesday Courses

Thank You for Another Great Semester!

As we entered our 25th year, our instructors, volunteers, and members assisted in making the spring semester an overwhelming success. With a desire to continually innovate and meet our students where they are, we are proud to announce that in addition to in-person classes, virtual and hybrid courses will continue to be offered for the foreseeable future.

We look forward to seeing you for the fall 2022 semester, as we continue the celebration of ILR’s 25th anniversary!

Economics and You

The "Economics and You" courses continue with fascinating, interactive, evidence-based presentations and videos on issues that impact all consumers including controversial issues and recent events. We will discuss the “animal spirits" of behavioral economics, which explain how consumers choose to behave with their money. See how history, politics, and economics collide with the present and affect you and your grandchildren. If you were bored by economics in school, this is for you!

Instructor: Paul Lohr is a retired business manager, consultant, teacher, and elected official. He served one four-year term on the Lakota School District Board of Education.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 9:00–10:15 a.m.
Format: Classroom
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 116


A Fate Worse Than Death? Considering Dementia through a Disability Studies Lens

Dementia is among the most feared conditions in modern America, largely due to its defining characteristics of memory loss, disorientation, confusion of time and place, and dependency. Dementia is often viewed as a fate worse than death. The individual, cultural, and societal anxiety around dementia results in isolation, erasure, and dehumanization. Topics will include: how dementia is defined, how our culture tells stories about dementia, how we can better care for people with dementia, and how we can work toward interdependent communities in which seniors with dementia are included and supported.

Instructors: Hailee Yoshizaki-Gibbons is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Humanities at Hiram College. Hailee's research examines intersections of aging and disability with a focus on dementia. Kathy McMahon-Klosterman, Professor Emerita of Educational Psychology, taught Disability Studies and served on the Board of the International Society for Disability Studies.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 9:00–10:15 a.m.
Format: Virtual
Location: Online


Ancient Wisdom for Today: Taoism as an Approach to Life

Focusing on Lao Tzu’s Tao Te Ching, through presentation and discussion we will begin to introduce the basic concepts and tenets of this philosophy, such as yin/yang and wu wei (going with the flow), and how they can help inspire a more balanced, mindful, centered, and holistic life. The course is intended to be a spiritual yet applicable exploration of the text rather than an academic deep dive into this Chinese philosophy.

Class text: Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, translated by Gia Fu-Feng and Jane English, Vintage, A Division of Random House, 1972, ISBN: 0-394-71833-X

Instructor: Michael Hieber, Miami University Emeritus, taught a variety of art and integrative studies courses on the Middletown campus for 35 years.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 10:45 a.m.–noon
Format: Virtual
Location: Online


Introduction to Birding

What is birding and why is it so much fun? This course has everything you need to know to develop your birding skills: field marks for various classes of birds (hawks, backyard birds, warblers, sparrows); equipment; birding seasons; habitats; daily routines; local birding spots; local organizations; songs; computer support software; and the great fun of birding festivals all over the country.

Instructor: Richard Marra is a retired chemical engineer and avid birder of many years. Richard has traveled all over the country birding, from frozen Minnesota in January, by boat in the Atlantic and Pacific, yearly to the Magee Marsh, as well as to Texas, Arizona, and Florida.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 10:45 a.m.–noon
Format: Classroom
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 116


Hemingway's Nick Adams In Our Time

The 1925 publication of In Our Time, an integrated collection of short stories and vignettes, put Hemingway on the literary map at the age of 26 and remains one of the masterpieces of modern literature. The book introduces Hemingway's favorite character, Nicholas Adams, who is clearly a version of the author himself. In our class, we will discuss the nine Nick Adams stories in In Our Time, culminating with what may be Hemingway's finest short story, "Big Two-Hearted River." For our first class, read "Indian Camp" and "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife."

Class text: Ernest Hemingway, The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway: The Finca Vigia Edition, Scribner, 1998, ISBN: 0684843323

Instructor: Don Daiker, Professor Emeritus of English, serves on the Editorial Board of The Hemingway Review. He has published on the Nick Adams stories and much enjoys discussing and interpreting them.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 10:45 a.m.–noon
Format: Hybrid
Location: Online or Oxford, Peabody Hall, Room 31


From Old Miami to Gettysburg: A Visit with Charles Anderson

Charles Anderson is a Miami grad, '33. That's 1833! Charles Anderson's Miami experience and family connections projected him into a life that threads through many of the significant events of mid-19th century America. He became a farmer, lawyer, soldier, developer, scholar, Lieutenant Governor, and Governor of Ohio. We will take a visit with 'Charlie' by examining a recently discovered collection of his personal papers and documents. Included in this historical trove was Charles Anderson's "Lost Gettysburg Address." What did Anderson say, and what did he edit? What did Lincoln think about Anderson's speech? Let's find out together. Join us on a visit with this fascinating Miami grad.

Class texts: Walter Havinghurst, Men of Old Miami 1809-1873: A Book of Portraits, Putnam, 1974, ISBN-10: 0399113290, Chapter 3, “The Education of Charles Anderson” (will be available as a PDF along with several other original documents that will be required reading); David T. Dixon, The Lost Gettysburg Address, B List History, 2015, ISBN-10: 0986155101 (recommended, not required)

Instructor: Rob Tolley is a Senior Lecturer Emeritus of Anthropology from Indiana University East and a Miami alumnus. His work as an anthropologist took him to many wilderness areas of North America. He currently serves as President of the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the Mountain Man in Pinedale, Wyoming.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 12:30–1:45 p.m.
Format: Virtual
Location: Online


Writing Single-Memory Memoir

Do you have a story to tell? In this writing workshop, you will compose and refine a short memoir piece based on a personal memory and receive supportive feedback about your work. Digital handouts related to memoir writing will be discussed as well. Your goal may be to publish your short memoir, to keep it in a family album to share with future generations, or simply to put a memory into words. While instructor-led, this is a highly participatory course. Writing between class meetings will be necessary. All levels are welcome!

Instructor: Julia Miller has published poetry and memoir in several literary journals and anthologies.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 12:30–1:45 p.m.
Format: Virtual
Location: Online


Wednesday Brown Bag Lecture Series

Relax and enjoy. Learn about the history of chiropractic, Mona Lisa's smile, projects in our community, walking through our wonderful Metro Parks, and Doris Day! While the lectures are independent, those registering are encouraged to attend the entire series. Join us for this ILR tradition.

March 30Nerves, Fishmongers, and Conspiracies: Unbelievably Entertaining History of ChiropracticDr. Joe Minnich co-founded Revelation Chiropractic in Mason alongside his wife, Dr. Jen Minnich. They have been in practice since 2011 and have loved every minute of it!

April 6Mona Lisa, What's with that Smile?Marian Fisher is a member of the Women’s Art Club and the Arts Alliance Painters in Cincinnati.

April 13Hydrogen, Submarines, and Politics: What do These Topics have in Common?Bob Viney is a member of the Leadership Council for Millennium Reign Energy, a Dayton company that builds and operates green hydrogen refueling stations, and the author of American Turning Point – Repairing and Restoring Our Constitutional Republic

April 20Walkers in the ParksBill Walker is President of Friends of MetroParks, a nonprofit group with a mission to improve and preserve Butler County parks for future generations. A longtime photographer, Bill finds opportunities to capture images of wildlife in the park, both four-legged and two-legged.

April 27Doris Day, Her Life, Her SongsCarl Bishop is a retired chemist who took an interest in Doris Day when he saw her in a movie in 1956 when she sang "Que Sera, Sera."

Coordinator: Marlene Esseck is a retired elementary teacher for the Lakota School District.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 12:30–1:45 p.m.
Format: Classroom
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 127


Playing with Color: An Introduction to Watercolor

Remember painting with watercolors in school? There’s much more to it than the tins of colored paste and tiny brushes you used back then. Learn the basics of color theory and watercolor technique with daily hands-on practice. Good quality paint, brushes, and paper will be supplied. Bring an apron or work shirt to protect your clothing.

Instructor: Elizabeth Brice is a retired Miami librarian and lifelong arts hobbyist. She has studied watercolor for over 25 years and has a studio at the Oxford Community Arts Center.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 2:00–3:30 p.m.
Format: Classroom
Location: Oxford Seniors, Art Room
Supply fee: $40.00, paid with registration


Cold Serial: The Jack the Strangler Murders

Investigate a series of recently uncovered murders that could lead to a serial killer. The venue is the Dayton/Cincinnati area; the time, 1900-1911. A woman escapes and a person of interest emerges. Forensics and police practices of the time, yellow journalism, the handling of sexual assault, crime literature of the era, racism, and antisemitism will be examined. Evidence will be presented to you, the jurors, in the final class. You will be asked to grant justice to these girls and convict a suspect on multiple counts of murder and rape.

Class text: Provided free to all attendees courtesy of the instructor.

Instructor: Brian Forschner worked in the criminal justice system in corrections, was an Associate Professor in the University of Dayton Criminal Justice Program, and has published and conducted study abroad programs for criminal justice students and professionals.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 2:15–3:30 p.m.
Format: Classroom
Location: West Chester, VOALC, Room 127


People Who Changed the World

How does one person make a difference and change the course of history? This online lecture series invites you to contemplate people who fundamentally shaped the human experience. Organized by the Miami University Humanities Center, each talk will be given by a member of Miami's nationally recognized faculty in the humanities and will examine the history and cultural legacy of persons who transformed their world.

March 30Tikhon Bellavin, Patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church in the Midst of the Bolshevik RevolutionScott Kenworthy, Associate Professor of Comparative Religion, is a scholar of Eastern Orthodox Christianity with a focus on modern Russia.

April 6Nam June Paik, the Father of Video ArtDr. Annie Dell'Aria, Assistant Professor of Art and Architecture History, is the author of The Moving Image as Public Art: Sidewalks, Spectators and Modes of Enchantment.

April 13Virginia WoolfMadelyn Detloff, Professor and Chair of English, is the author of numerous publications on Virginia Woolf and modern literature.

April 20Hannah Arendt, Humanist, Philosopher, SurvivorEmily Zakin, Professor of Philosophy, is the author of many publications on the limits and possibilities of political community.

April 27Jimi HendrixTammy Brown, Associate Professor of History and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies, is currently working on a biography of rock ’n’ roll virtuoso Jimi Hendrix.

Coordinator: Pepper Stetler is Associate Professor of Art History and Associate Director of the Miami University Humanities Center.

5 Wednesdays: March 30–April 27; 4:00–5:15 p.m.
Format: Virtual
Location: Online